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tv   BBC News  BBC News  June 28, 2017 4:00pm-5:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. i'm ben brown live in warrington where it has been announced that six people are to be charged in connection with the hillsborough football stadium disaster of 28 years ago. following these thorough investigations and our careful review of the evidence in accordance with the code for crown prosecutors, i have decided there is sufficient evidence to charge six individuals with criminal offences. relatives of some of those who died at hillsborough have been giving their reaction to today's news. we just have to see what the future holds. we have still got a long journey to go on now. i'm simon mccoy with annita mcveigh. the other headlines here on bbc news: police say the final death
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toll from the grenfell tower fire will not be known for many months — 80 people are currently known to have died or have been confirmed as missing, presumed dead. to have died or have been confirmed due to have died or have been confirmed to the intense some due to the intense heat there maybe some people that we never identify. tackling the world—wide cyber attack as yesterday's outbreak begins to be brought under control. researchers say a new security programme can't stop the bug from spreading. and the creator of paddington bear, michael bond, has died at home after a short illness. he was 91. good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. relatives of those who died 28 years ago were briefed today by the crown
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prosecution service on the cps‘ decision to bring criminal charges against six individuals, six people, in connection with that disaster in 1989 in which 96 liverpool football fa ns 1989 in which 96 liverpool football fans lost their lives. so, four of those six people were formally members of the south yorkshire police force and they include former south yorkshire chief superintendent, david duckenfield. he was match commander on the day of the disaster. he is accused of manslaughter by gross negligence. also charged is the former chief co nsta ble, also charged is the former chief constable, sir norman bettison, facing four charges of misconduct in a public office relate to go the telling of alleged lies in the aftermath of the tragedy. well, relatives of those who died, who have been briefed here, by the cps, have been briefed here, by the cps, have welcomed the charges against the six individuals. they've had inquiries, inquests and investigations but the hillsborough families have
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never seen public criminal prosecutions against anyone involved in the 1989 disaster. they've waited nearly 30 years for this moment. this morning they arrived full of hope and anxiety, to be told that six people are to face prosecution. they include david duckenfield who was in charge of policing the match. and sir norman bettison who is alleged to have lied about fans after the disaster. there is sufficient evidence to charge former chief superintendent david duckenfield with the manslaughter by gross negligence of 95 men, women and children. mr duckenfield was the match commander on the day of the disaster. david duckenfield, seen here in 1989, is being charged with the manslaughter of all but one of the 96 liverpool fans who died in the disaster. we are unable to charge the manslaughter of anthony bland, the 96th casualty who died almost four years later. this is due to time limitations imposed by the law as it
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applied at the time. the liverpool fans were killed when the terraces at the sheffield ground became overcrowded during the 1989 fa cup semi—final. david duckenfield had ordered the opening of an exit gate through which fans poured into the ground. in the years after hillsborough sir norman bettison rose through the ranks to become chief constable of merseyside and later west yorkshire. given his seniority, prosecutors will askjurors to find that he abused the public‘s trust. former chief constable norman bettison is charged with four offences of misconduct in public office. this relates to alleged lies he told about his involvement in the aftermath of hillsborough and the culpability of fans. the bereaved families emerged from their meeting with the cps having learned there will be prosecutions. i'm absolutely delighted.
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we've got today everything we could have asked for. the decisions by the cps in my opinion were correct or are correct. and we look forward to the due process through a court of law. graham mackrell was sheffield wednesday company secretary and safety officer in 1989. he's accused of failing to carry out his duties charged under health and safety law and the safety of sports ground act. peter metcalf was the solicitor acting for south yorkshire police. he's charged with perverting the course of justice in relation to amendments made to witness statements. former officers chief superintendent donald denton in the middle and dci alan foster who is not shown are charged with the same offence. donald denton is said to have overseen the process of altering the statements. no one from the ambulance service is being prosecuted and no organisation will face corporate charges. it's the culmination of more than four years of work by hundreds of investigators.
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they've looked through thousands of documents including police notebooks from 1989 which were recovered from lofts, garages and offices and combed through page by page. the investigations have cost in the region of £100 million and expectations of prosecutions were high. donna miller lost her brother paul carlile at hillsborough, today is a hard day, her mother didn't live to see the prosecutions announced. the fact that my mum is not here, this is the first big event that my mum's not here, she died on the 26th april this year. and this was a day she was determined to be here for. so it's sad for me without my mum. the youngest to die at hillsborough was just ten years old, the oldest, a pensioner. they were all unlawfully killed. there have long been calls for justice. now almost 30 years after they were killed, those said to be responsible will face trial and the prospect of jail. the hillsborough campaigners say
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they have been fighting for three decades for truth, justice and accountability and after the news from the cps today, they said this was an important milestone. one said "we need peace from hillsborough. it has been a 28 yearjourney and this is the beginning of the end of that journey. trevor hicks who lost two daughters in the disaster says, "this decision shows that no one is above the law. for the independent cps on our
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behalf and society at large have preferred charges against some people and obviously we can't discuss those now because of subjudacy. i'm going to add to what trevor said. i think what it has done today, we changed the course, hopefully, for the future of the country that you know, don't ever give up hope. if you carry on fighting as the families have, for all of them years, that things can change and things must change and this must never happen again. no one, no this must never happen again. no one, 110 one this must never happen again. no one, no one should have to go through what these families have gone through for 28 years to get to, to try and get to the truth, to get accountability especially. i think that's important and i think now what has been achieved today will change things for the good of this nation and i think that's the legacy of our 96 that they will have left behind on their behalf. the cps were considering evidence,
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more than 100,000 pages of evidence from two separate criminal inquiries. the ipcc who were looking into the albleged cover—up and operation resolve looking into events operation resolve looking into eve nts o n operation resolve looking into events on the day and before the day and all that evidence was considered over the last few months by the cps. they were investigating more than 20 potential suspects at the end of it, they have decided to bring charges against those six individuals, most of them, will appear before warrington magistrates' court in warrington magistrates' court in warrington on 9th august. police investigating the grenfell fire have released a statement in the last hour, saying they now believe at least 80 people died in the tragedy or are missing, presumed dead. they say that there are 23 flats where they've been unable to trace anyone from which they presume no one survived. a list of tenants provided by the management company is now known to be inaccurate
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and scotland yard says the investigation into the number of dead will take until the end of the year at least. detective superintendent fiona mccormack gave this update a short time ago. i believe the number will rise throughout this, but what i really appeal to and what we do know that still exists is there are other numbers out there and to me these aren't numbers. that's what i really wa nt to aren't numbers. that's what i really want to get across. these are people that died in a fire. so i really wa nt to that died in a fire. so i really want to appeal for people to come to the police, to call ourfree phone numberand give us the police, to call ourfree phone number and give us those lists and tell us what happened. i've stated on friday, i will restate it, that we are not worried about immigration issues. we are not worried about sub—letting issues. we just issues. we are not worried about sub—letting issues. wejust really wa nt to sub—letting issues. wejust really want to be able to look after
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families of those that are deceased but account for every victim of people that died in the fire at the time. you, and the government, and toa time. you, and the government, and to a certain extent the media, which has reported what you and the government have been saying have been accused of concealing people thaw know to be dead, of covering up the true figure. what's your response to that? well, that's the not case at the moment. the first initial housing lists that we had we re initial housing lists that we had were incorrect and i understand that. london is a very transient population. i'm a londoner myself. so, we expect that the initial housing lists aren't the people that actually perhaps live in grenfell tower. so, we're working from a difficult start off point if you like. so what we have had to do is start right at the beginning and personally speak to occupants of every one of those flats. so that is where we're coming to our numbers 110w. where we're coming to our numbers now. i'm not saying that these are going to be the confirmed numbers, that's going take months and months
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to do and we're doing that through asi to do and we're doing that through as i say talking to occupants, talking to community groups to establish exactly who was in that flat that night, alongside that, we're also doing that recovery operation that is going to be a fingertip recovery operation with my police officers along with experts and anthropologists to get a true number of who died that night in the g re nfell number of who died that night in the grenfell fire. sarah campbell is at westminster magistrates' court. some truly heartbreaking details emerging. yes, anita, seven ip qesz opened and adjourned today in front of the coroner dr fiona willcox. a 23—year—old syrian refugee was one
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of the first venus williams to be publicly named. his family said at the time he was looking forward to going back to syria to help rebuild the country. today, we found out that he was recovered from the base of the tour we are, the postmortem found that his cause of death was multiple injuries consistent with a fall from height. of course, we know that many families were tragically killed in the fire. the next is possibly the youngest victim that we know about so far. her date of birth 14th december 2016, she wasjust know about so far. her date of birth 14th december 2016, she was just six months old. she was recovered, we heard today from the 19th and 20th stairwell. she was found in her mother's arms. her parents inquest has already been opened and adjourned. also adjourned today that of her older sister. she was her eight—year—old sister. she and her older sister were taken to hospital after the fire, taken to st mary's hospital and that is where
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eight—year—old malik died. their other sister, their surviving sister remains in hospital. we heard details about a 64—year—old woman. she was recovered from the 17th floor. a postmortem indicated she died from the effects of fire. her daughter was also found. we know that family of five missing, presumed, dead in the fire. another man, he was a taxi driver. witnesses said he was last seen trying to help people escape the building. he was recovered from outside grenfell tower opposite the entrance to the leisure centre. his postmortem showed the cause of death was from multiple injuries consistent with a fall from height. today, a man born in 1939. he was 77 yea rs today, a man born in 1939. he was 77 years old. he was recovered from flat 1 years old. he was recovered from flat1 on years old. he was recovered from flat 1 on the 11th floor of grenfell
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tower. the cause of death from inhalation of fire fumes. all the postmortems were opened and adjourned today. they will be reopened on the 12thjuly. and the coroner, dr fiona willcox made a clear pint r point after each individual inquest was delivered to make sure her condolences were recorded on behalf of the family of those who died. the headlines on bbc news: six people are to be charged in connection with the hillsborough football stadium disaster 28 years ago. david duckenfield will be charged with the manslaughter of 95 of the 96 victims. police say the final death toll from the grenfell tower fire won't be known for many months. and in sport, defending champion andy murray is named number one seed
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for wimbledon which starts on monday. it's the first time in 12 grand slams that the big four are the top seeds with novak djokovic second, followed by roger federer and rafael nadal. british women's number one joanna konta is through to the third round of the aegon championships beating romanian sora na cirstea in straight sets. bianca walkden has become the first british fighter successfully to defend a world tae kwon do championship title after beating jackie galloway of the usa in south korea. i'll be back with more on those stories after a.30pm. join me then. a cyber attack which hit organisations around the world yesterday is being brought under control, according to security analysts. among the institutions affected were the ukrainian central bank, the british advertising agency wpp and the port of rotterdam. researchers say they've developed a programme that can protect individual computers, although it can't stop
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the bug from spreading. earlier i spoke to brian lord. i think the nature of an attack like this which is similar to the the attack from two weeks ago, are designed specifically to hit large organisations and spread malware within an organisation and therefore have an effect on the efficiency on how they operate. so if deployed it can significantly impact public services and the business of government even if that is only for a temporary period. and the intention of whoever is behind it, may be financial, but obviously someone else dreaming up another cyber attack may have other purposes in mind as well? that's quite an interesting point because when one looks at the nature of this attack, the amount of revenue that it is generated is very, very small and actually,
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there are doubts whether the primary purpose of this was in fact financial. the measures that were put in place to collect the money which one would assume if you were financially driven would be the most important element, were random and ad hoc and amateurish. so there is a sense actually that the real intent of this was to cause disruption, was to cause damage, but you are right as well, any observer of this, in mind these tools are in the public domainment any observer can go i'm going to try that. we will try that and we will apply it in a different way against a different set of targets. what more do we know today? what we have seen is that the nature of the attack, i think, in this case was introduced into an organisation, it is felt through a system update. an update of accounting software.
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that's worrying since a lot of security advice is to make sure you update your systems and that's based upon a premise that the updates are secure. it was introduced into the organisations in a slightly different way from before. as we are saying researchers have found a way of how to stop the effect on individual machines, but the spread of this isn't as systemic or as endemic as previous attacks. a previous guest was urging that there should be a major investment in core it systems to protect what he called the soft underbelly of these systems. would you agree with that and could you give us an insight into what gchq is doing to mitigate against attacks like this? right, ok, well, first of all, i would agree with that. we are facing the technology debt where each time an organisation, a large organisation, defers an update, an upgrade, whether that's security or systemic, what happens the technology debt gets bigger and bigger.
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we are all absolutely dependant upon our it infrastructure and that's been seen from the effect. if you are dependant upon something you have to invest in its maintenance otherwise you are leaving gaps all over for people to exploit. in terms of what gchq are doing and within the context of this, this will be the national cyber security centre which we set—up last year. they will be looking at exactly what happened. they will be working with industry to gather as much data as they can to provide one, immediate advice and to start rolling out longer term advice as to how to stop this from happening again. talks to restore northern ireland's devolved administration are continuing with just one full day left to reach an agreement. discussions have been taking place between the five main parties and the british and irish governments to try to restore power—sharing at stormont. let's speak to the bbc‘s former ireland correspondent denis murray. he's in our belfast newsroom.
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denis, i'm having flashbacks! i have that effect on all the presenters! it is great to see you. you have been here before. i'm just wondering if you have known anything go to the wire like this? yes, well the good friday agreement went right to the wire and it went beyond the deadline, but it was close to agreement at that stage, but there we re agreement at that stage, but there were lots of other deadlines. we lost cou nt were lots of other deadlines. we lost count of them in the days when tony blair and bertie ahern were the prime ministers. i'm not sure what's going to happen after this one. the secretary of state only has two options, one is to call another election or to reimpose direct rule, in other words central government would take over the running of northern ireland and the financial administration of northern ireland which is all the more relevant now because of the deal between the dup and the conservative party. but i've
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heard mike nesbitt, who is the former lead of the ulster unionists, he says nothing will be done as drastically as that. what they will do, the head of the northern ireland civil service can get the budget to work. it will be handed to the civil serva nts work. it will be handed to the civil servants just with one secretary of state rather than five or six junior ministers running the departments and then try and get devolution going again in the autumn. the one thing i'm certain of, whether they agree over the next couple of days or not, nobody is going to walk away from the talks so angry that they are never coming back, there will be another go at trying to restore devolution. sure. you seem to be suggesting farfrom devolution. sure. you seem to be suggesting far from brinkmanship, there are stumbling blocks here? the one that's really become the absolute crucible of the thing is sinn fein are demanding an irish language act and what's more, they demanding a stand alone irish act. now that would give the irish language a status in northern ireland, the way welsh has it in
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wales, gaelic has it in scotland and sinn fein would like something like the welsh model and the most visible thing would be street signs and road signs in english and in irish. but you'd be beginning to have legal documents for instance in the republic of ireland, you can't be a teacher or a civil servant without having some kind of a qualification in the irish language. now, the dup have been bitterly opposed to this, but they are now beginning, i think it is on the table, but what the dup are saying is they would like part of it to include ulster scots which some people says is a dialect, but they say it is a real language because of the closeness of county antrim and scotland. if you listen to brendan rodgers who is from that pa rt to brendan rodgers who is from that part of county an thrill, he sounds likes' from scotland, but the point about that act, it is not so much about that act, it is not so much about the language, it has come to be the crystallisation of sinn
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fein‘s view that the dup are not respecting the irish tradition and not respecting sinn fein and its electorate, their identity as irish, so the whole difference between the two sides, that's the absolute focus of it. so, if there is no irish language act, there will be no agreement and if they're going, the dup try and tack on the ulster scots as part of it and sinn fein say no, well than you are not going to get agreement over the next couple of days. and you haven't even mentioned the word brexit? well, the funny thing about brexit, as another pundit once put it, brexit became something else that protestants and catholics could disagree with because the dup were in the brexit camp and sinn fein in particular we re camp and sinn fein in particular were in favour of remain, but the parties had talks, they had all—party talks before the assembly collapsed in january and all all—party talks before the assembly collapsed injanuary and all sides are saying they came close to agreement on a common approach to brexit. and the dup don't want to see the hard border back in because
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it would hurt agriculture in northern ireland. it would hurt business in northern ireland to have that hard border back. so, and i think you would see the dup's impact on the opening of the negotiations last week with david davis in europe. there was a distinct softening of the approach. the dup don't agree with theresa may's no deal is better than a bad deal. they would rather have a bad deal. they wa nt would rather have a bad deal. they want some kind of a deal and in fact they want a soft deal, but that's more to do with the link between the dup and theresa may than it is to do with devolution. now, will the money that's been given to northern ireland act as an incentive to get them back together? it might. if you we re them back together? it might. if you were going to be a minister, in a new executive, you'd have lots of money to spend whereas before you we re money to spend whereas before you were saying you couldn't do anything because you had no money to spend. so that might actually act as an incentive to get people back around the table. looking ahead, arlene foster, michelle o'neill, two tough women. what sort of working
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relationship will they have? they will make it work if they get to the point where they agree on restoring devolution because they have to and it doesn't matter really if they actually don't like each other very much. and i mean, there is certainly, they didn't look terribly friendly during the television debates, during the assembly election here in february and march time. michelle o'neill has accused the dup of being arrogant and disrespectful. but peter robinson and martin mcguinness didn't like each other very much and arlene foster and martin mcguinness didn't like each other very much. it doesn't matter if you can get on or not, it matters if you can do business. denis murray, this leaving the bbc thing seems to have suited you rather well. it is good to see you rather well. it is good to see you again. denis, thank you very much. the duke and duchess of cambridge and prince harry will attend a
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private service to rededicate the grave of diana, princess of wales. the service will fall on what would have been diana's 56th birthday. it will be conducted by the archbishop of canterbury and attended by her family. the co—op bank has agreed a rescue package with shareholders worth about £700 million. it should mean the bank, which almost collapsed in 2013, will no longer need to be sold. a short time ago our business editor simonjack explained how the company has kept going over the last few years. a bunch of american investors came in to save it then and ever since then it has been limping along unable to earn it's way out of trouble. they couldn't find a buyer for the bank when they wanted. so those same investors have now doubled down and written off some of the money that they were owed and put some new money in which will mean that their shareholding is entirely owned by us investors. the co—op group which used who wholy own it will own 1%. the co—op branding will stay. the ethical values will also
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stay, but agreement between the co—op group, the grocery stores and the funeral services, whatever and the co—op bank will terminate. so in 2020. so it is a big change from the 1872 when it was founded to being almost majority owned by hedge funds. it will be interesting to see how co—op customers, who have been pretty loyal through some big difficulties including some scandals, will be when they are no longer part of the co—op group, but a good day for the co—op bank. tomasz has the weather. the areas that had the real soaking yesterday particularly in east anglia where we had to up to 90 millimetres of rain. here the
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weather is drying out. we don't want more rainfall here. the rain will be falling across northern areas and in the south—west, you can see cornwall and devon and into parts of wales as well. this is a slow moving area of rain. moving northwards into scotla nd rain. moving northwards into scotland and another one which is starting it fizzle out tonight across south—western areas. these are the temperatures early on thursday morning. 12 or 13 in the south, ten or 11 celsius, so fairly uniform across the country. it is tomorrow's weather. so a wet day across the north—east of england initially. some damp weather in parts of northern england. a really wet day for scotland. some of these western areas, but central and south—eastern areas, a drier day. hello. this is bbc news with annita mcveigh and simon mccoy. the headlines at 16:30. six men are to be prosecuted in connection with the hillsborough disaster; they include the police commander on the day, david duckenfield, who is facing charges of manslaughter
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by gross negligence. relatives of some of those who died at hillsborough say it's the right decision. i'm absolutely delighted. we've got today everything that we could have asked for. $— at grenfell tower, in which at least 80 people died, was "not compliant" with building regulations. so far 120 tower blocks across england have failed fire safety tests. and the creator of paddington bear, michael bond, has died at home after a short illness, at the age of 91. just getting some reaction to one of those who faces charges as a result of that announcement following the hillsborough disaster. former chief co nsta ble hillsborough disaster. former chief constable sir norman burton faces four allegations of misconduct in public office, over the disaster, he says he is disappointed to be charged and will vigorously defend
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his innocence. that's the latest on that. now to the sports centre for the latest with damien. that afternoon. world number one and defending champion andy murray has been confirmed as the top seed for wimbledon. it takes into account recent grass—court form, with murray heading the "big four", as our tennis correspondent russell fuller explains.. with extra weight given to recent grass court form, there are significant differences between the men's rankings and seedings. world number four djokovic will be in the other half of the draw to murray as the second seed, roger federer is seeded and nadal is fourth. either of those could meet murray in the semifinals. with stan wawrinka at number five a potential quarterfinal opponent for any of them. the women's seedings reflect the rankings, angelique kerber number one and johanna konta at number six, her highest ever grand slam seeding. british women's number one joanna konta is through to the third round of the aegon championships in
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eastbourne. she beat the romanian sorana cirstea in straight sets 6—62, 6—2. ben croucher reports. you wait all yesterday to play in eastbourne and then two matches come along at once, that is whatjohanna konta effaced, that she had to be sorana cirstea konta effaced, that she had to be sora na cirstea of konta effaced, that she had to be sorana cirstea of romania and she didn't look like she expended to much energy to beat her. johanna konta in her hometown, her opponent more at home on clay and you could tell that the british and one had too much variety in a one—sided match. the last time they met was that infamous federation cup tie wherejohanna that infamous federation cup tie where johanna konta that infamous federation cup tie wherejohanna konta was left in tea rs wherejohanna konta was left in tears following comments by ilie nastase. this time her opponent was more upset and not able to cope with the barrage of winners coming her way. commentator: theatres, what a way. commentator: theatres, what a way to finish things off forjohanna konta. one down, want to go and not long to wait before facing the jelena ostapenko. —— one down, one
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to go. i played once before, we are on a different service year but she will be coming in with a lot of confidence, but she has achieved is incredible so i'm looking forward to playing against a grand slam champion and looking forward to competing. djokovic has been in action at eastbourne today after an almost wash—out yesterday, centre court was packed, djokovic beat pospisil three sets. was first grass court match this season and the first time in seven yea rs season and the first time in seven years he has played at a pre—wimbledon grass court tournament. ritish taekwondo history has been made today. bianca walkden has become the first british fighter to defend a world taekwondo championship title. walkden beat american jackie galloway 14—1; in the +73kg weight class in south korea. it is not sangin at all, i'm just so
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happy, like, idid it is not sangin at all, i'm just so happy, like, i did not think it would be that fluent, not easy because it's a difficult opponent, i'm just buzzing, i don't think it has sunk in yet. men's heavyweight mahama cho has guaranteed the british team a second medal. he's into the semi—finals after beating iran's sajad mardani. like walkden, cho won bronze in rio last year. but the rio silver medallist lutalo muhammad has gone out in the second round. it was his first event after his defeat at the olympics. dani alves has confirmed he's leaving juventus as his proposed move to manchester city edges closer. city manager pep guardiola is keen to link up with the 34—year—old following their prolific spell together at barcelona. alves still had a year left on hisjuventus contract but the italian champions have released him from the deal. persistent rain has seen today's women's cricket world cup game between south africa and new zealand abandoned. they were due to start at 1030 this morning in derby,
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but thanks to conditions like this, there wasn't a single ball bowled. new zealand and south africa are currently first and second in the eight—team group stage — having both won their opening games. they each receive a point for today's result. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more in the next hour. thank you. labour is to force a vote this evening on an amendment to the queen's speech calling for an end to cuts in the police and emergency services. the party is also demanding an end to the 1% cap on public sector pay rises. the conservatives say only they will deliver the economy needed to properly fund the emergency services. what can we expect? labour has put forward this amendment on the queen's speech. it is being debated in the house of commons right now, calling for an end to the cup on public sector pay rises and more
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money for the police and fire services. public sector pay is something jeremy corbyn clearly feels he is on the front foot with coming he feels it went well for him in the election campaign. thinks labour was on the right side of the argument calling for an end to austerity. he thinks this will be popular and this amendment is a result of that. yet it is unlikely that the numbers will add up although the lib dems and the snp supported, it is not likely that labour will win the vote. there has been a suggestion from downing street that labour was prepared to redo this cap on public sector pay rises, downing street has clarified that business change in policy but this clearly feeling that this is not popular with voters and this is what led to theresa may's authorities being slashed, we've heard from some senior conservative mps already this afternoon who say
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that they believe that the public sector pay cap should be lifted. i'm joined by tory mps are oliver letwin, david cameron's former head of policy. thank you forjoining us. . public sector pay, the cap on public sector pay rises, as it run its course? i think the most urgent necessity is not in relation to the pay, it's finding the extra resources needed to increase the quality and quantity of provision for social care and to deal with some of the funding strains inside the nhs and schools. sol some of the funding strains inside the nhs and schools. so i think the patient, the customer comes first and that's why i would like to first see the government focusing first on the money to continue reducing the deficit yet at the same time finding extra cash will crucial services. i think in due course we will need to consider the question of the public
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sector pay cap, because the private sector pay cap, because the private sector pay, which had been very considerably less good in many cases than the public sector, has now stopped falling so sharply, and we have seen the public sector fall back into the position where many public sector workers are now paid less well than comparable people in the private sector, therefore, gradually, you have to adapt to that reality by doing something about public sector pay. if we do see an end to the cup on public sector pay rises perhaps more money for public services. a dramatic shift in policy driven by the election result because parliamentary arithmetic, has that meant you had to change course? no, with the rest of the tory party shall pay no attention to mr corbyn's efforts to persuade us that we should go on a vast
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borrowing splurge. that's not the issue. there will be a solid parliamentary majority against the labour amendment. what we are talking about is something that has varied over a long period, both labour and conservative governments have to respond to circumstances as they find them. in the immediate period post—2008 public sector pay was high, private sector pay was liking, we had a huge deficit, that situation is now adjusting and we have to adjust to that reality. what we discovered on the doorstep wasn't about the public sector pay, is about the public sector pay, is about the public sector pay, is about the level of service in the nhs. that is the first thing we have to find money to fight. if services get more money and there seems to be shifting mood that they need to be better funded, where will that money come from. you are talking about continuing the deficit reduction. come from. you are talking about continuing the deficit reductionlj think it will mean some welljudged carefully presented tax rises. we
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saw in the election that sadly it is not possible to come up with a tax rise, too quickly, presented well enough, encountered great resistance and need to drop it. that's not the way we need to go now we have time on our hands and i'm sure the government will stop carefully about how to have welljudged tax rises of a kind that the nation will accept. i think there's a widespread view that as long as the money is well used, efficiently used, to improve subject to egg public services, people are willing to a little extra tax. we aren't talking about huge sums, just a little extra tax. where, in your opinion, should those tax rises fall? miz i'm not going to prejudge the next budget, it's a silly thing for a backbencher to do. it's important we take this argument in two stages. the first stage is to get the sort of national consensus that there are key public services that there are key public services that need extra funding but we do
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need to continue the deficit reduction and therefore we need tax rises. once we reach that point it's over to the chancellor to work out how best to do that and the government as a whole to work out how to sell it. sir oliver letwin, thank you. we are expecting this vote in the commons this evening. at the moment the debate is continuing. the numbers suggest thatjeremy corbyn's amendment won't get past but there are rumblings about lifting the cap on public sector finances. thank you. let's get more on the news that the creator of paddington bear, michael bond, has died at the age of 91. from paddington's first appearance he was a hit with young readers and he was a hit with young readers and he was a hit with young readers and he was later reinvented successfully on tv and more recently for film. our parts respond and david sillitoe looks back at the life of michael
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bond —— arts correspondent. paddington. charming, peruvian, accident prone. the creation of a former bbc cameraman, michael bond. and modelled on his father. good afternoon, he said, can i help you? my father was a very polite man and always wore a hat in case he met someone. and paddington has a lot of him in it. he wrote the first story after buying a toy bear. he never thought it would be published but it was just the beginning, millions were sold and translated into more than 30 languages. michael bond also wrote another children's favourite from the seventies, the herbs. with parsley, the lion. there's parsley. sometimes mronly and let the lion. there's parsley. sometimes mr only and let simple the school bell. but popularity grew and grew.
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there was of course the tv programme... 32 winter gardens. a paddington musical... a paddington film... this was the prototype made by shirley clarkson for the children, joe allen me — joanna shirley clarkson for the children, joe allen me —joanna and shirley clarkson for the children, joe allen me — joanna and jeremy. yes, thatjeremy clarkson. narrator: mrs bird made very good stews. friendly, polite, fond of marmalade. there have been many fictional bears but none quite like michael bond's paddington. michael bond who has died aged 91. the children's laureate, lauren child, joins me. there has been a huge outpouring of affection,
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eve ryo ne huge outpouring of affection, everyone loves paddington's marmalade salvages under his hat, the unfailingly polite bear from pirro occupies a special place in so many hearts and minds. wrench mac absolutely, wonderful creation. amazing that it is still as well loved us one i was a child, i used to watch the little model animation, which i also got my daughter to watch when she was tiny because it is so beautifully realised. and he is so beautifully realised. and he is such a sympathetic character. is that why you think the stories, the character, mean as much to children today as they did when the first book was published ? today as they did when the first book was published? well, i think so because there is something about paddington that is so much on the child's side. because he is so much like a child, clumsy, getting things wrong, rather accident prone but such a sweet character. and i think thatis such a sweet character. and i think that is the thing about michael. he's such a lovable person. i was
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a lwa ys he's such a lovable person. i was always delighted if he was at a party because he would always be fun to chat to because he had a slightly cheeky side, ready to include a person. —— twinkly eyed person. he was always such fun. was encouraging to you as you were developing your writing career? i did not really know him then. i met him at many publishing parties so i did not know him well but i always wanted to chat with him about guinea pigs. we have a great love for guinea pigs. we must remember olga da polga, another one of his creations. i needed a guinea pig for one of my claris been books, needed a picture of a certain guinea pig and i contacted a rescue
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centre was basically this man who would look after your guinea pigs. and he had one of michael's guinea pigs staying. i hope i'm right, because that is what he told me and i took a photo of his guinea pig which is in my book, called olga. i took a photo of his guinea pig which is in my book, called olgam isa which is in my book, called olgam is a wonderful story. there is an innocence about paddington, you mentioned his childlike qualities, there is an innocence, the good manners, it sort of hearts back to what seems like a much gentler time. it just goes to what seems like a much gentler time. itjust goes to show that quiet books like that and characters, very sympathetic characters really do work and children still love them, and the film is beautiful, i am looking forward to the next one. i think everyonejust looking forward to the next one. i think everyone just warmed to it because it was such a lovely story. i think the film broke the story and
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the character to people who had perhaps not come across paddington before and did not know much about him. it certainly looks as if the appeal of those books will go on and on, doesn't it. i certainly think so. they have just finished the second film, haven't they. i am sure it will be as popular as ever. i think he's wonderful. lauren child, the children's laureate, thank you. in a moment a look at how the financial markets in europe closed the day, but first —— the headlines on bbc news. it's just coming up to ten minutes to five. six people are to be charged in connection with the hillsborough football stadium disaster, 28 years ago. the senior police officer at the match, former chief superintendent david duckenfield, will be charged with the manslaughter of 95 of the 96 victims. police say the final death toll from the grenfell tower fire will not be known for many months. 80 people are currently known
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to have died or have been confirmed as missing, presumed dead. hello, this is your money update. let's look at how the markets in europe have been trading today. a roller—coaster. it in. sterling surged to a three—week high and britain's main ftse 100 stock index fell after bank of england governor mark carney said the bank was likely to need to raise interest rates and would debate this "in the coming months". let's look at the other stories moving the market. the people who manage investment funds are in for a shakeup. the financial conduct authority wants to make them more competitive — and better value for money. they'll also face a tougher duty to act in the interests of investors. tesco is cutting 1200 jobs at its head office. that's about a quarter of staff at welwyn garden city and hatfield. it's part of plan to cut costs
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and boost the company's fortunes. better news for the co—op bank. it's agreed a £700 million rescue package to stop it being wound up. investors have agreed to swap their debt for a stake in the bank. let's get detailed analysis of all of this with james bevan, chief investment officer at ccla investment management. thank you forjoining us.. is it time to breathe a sigh of relief about the co—op bank? time to breathe a sigh of relief about the co-op bank? no. this is a welcome relief but by no means the end of the chapter. so the hedge funds that have had to swap bonsall equity now have to raise £250 million. retail investors will get back 45p in the pound but it remains to be seen if the customers still wa nt to to be seen if the customers still want to be in the bank at all. tesco, trouble there, these redundancies at head office. does this speak to a wider problem in the retail sector. certainly does. tesco isa retail sector. certainly does. tesco is a retail bank which come out with
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results ten days ago and declared a margin of1.5%. results ten days ago and declared a margin of 1.5%. they've made a commitment to getting those margins up commitment to getting those margins up to 3.5%—4% by 2020. those margins will come in part by squeezing suppliers, in part by getting customers to pay more money in when they go shopping and inevitably by controlling costs. that's what the headcount reduction today is all about. do think the grand turnaround plan at tesco's is working? there's some evidence that shoppers are going back to tesco, they are spending a larger portion of their wallet at tesco's that is good news but getting those margins up will be long slog. fund managers have had a kicking today, the fco not painting a pretty picture about the state of the industry, what do you think about the measures introduced today, with regard to clarity over fees.
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the sca has been grumpy for a long time, the average margin is 36%, with dean talking about tesco trying to get to 3.5% by 2020 is one can understand that this is an industry thatis understand that this is an industry that is by no means competitive. the fca says, the first thing you have to do is be clear about what you are charging, it's the investor that bears the risk. whether this measure will generate the sort of competitive marketplace the fca wa nts competitive marketplace the fca wants is an open question because there is limited evidence in markets around the world that investors are that worried about costs as long as they think they were reasonably get a decent forward return. thank you, james. wall street opened higher, as financial stocks rose, back in the uk, as that managers have seen share prices fall after the news of a big
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shake—up being imposed on their industry. energy companies also came under pressure as more evidence emerged of a glut of oil on the market. that's it from me. let's get more now on the grenfell fire, and two weeks on, theresa may has called for a "major national investigation" into the use of potentially flammable cladding on high rise buildings. one man, olu talabi, and his family escaped from the 14th floor. our reporter ashleyjohn baptiste spent time with them as they try to rebuild their lives. some viewers might find the details in this report upsetting. that dead lady. that's debbie. i didn't know she was one of the people that's missing. wow. i feel funny, man. oh my god, they're screaming.
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as an outsider, i have no idea how this is affecting you. i just want to see what i've come up from. i can, i can smell it. it's not as strong as that night, but it brings back the memories. shall we go over here? that's my window. the other side, i tied a cloth, the bedroom was on the other side, that's where i tied the cloth. look at it. looks like something out of syria. like, i guarantee there's dead bodies in there right now. olu and his family have been staying at chelsea and westminster hospital since the fire but rebuilding their lives is about more thanjust finding a new home, it is about starting again. today, they are trying
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to sort out the essentials. his partner did not want us to show her on camera. it is going to be a long process to get everything back on track. so that it is like the start of getting your identity back, i feel like. local community centres and volunteers have been helping residents with money, clothes and food. we've come to get some help, from the people that have donated money, so we just try to get help from them. is this your money from your account? yeah. we are having to make it up as we go along because there is no precedent for it. i'm happy that people are looking to help us but i'm a hard—working guy, all of us in my family work hard, we make our own money, we don't want to feel like a charity case. this is the westway centre, it has become a key hub of support, more than just the practical help, it is the emotional support that brings people here.
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it's become a place where locals come, share stories, and console each other. thank you, thank you so much, i appreciate it, i appreciate the love. thank you so much. i appreciate it. how do you respond? do you feel like a hero? ijust feel like i save my family, i did what i have to do. we die together or we come out together, that's just it. you haven't had much sleep. you're clearly going to have a bit of trauma. you're now scared of the dark. how do you feel, when you're sleeping in your bed, and all you can see in bed is dead people. i feel like, when you have to leave the tv on, so you can see a bit of light when you're sleeping, so you don't have to think about that little boy who died in your room. or his mum. and you can see that film — and many more — on the victoria derbyshire programme page. visit bbc.co.uk/victoria. the victoria derbyshire programme is on each weekday morning at 9.00 on the bbc news channel and bbc 2.
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now it's tomasz with the weather. ido andi i do and i have more rain, not a pleasa nt stay i do and i have more rain, not a pleasant stay in northern britain, for some areas good news because gardeners and farmers like the rainfall but for many, another write—off like yesterday in the south—east. the rain in the north and more rain to night, and also tomorrow, just a reminder of how much rainfall we have had at the moment, top of the league still is suffolk, i think, moment, top of the league still is suffolk, ithink, in moment, top of the league still is suffolk, i think, in one spot we registered 90 millimetres of rain as this nasty area of weather, it's been moving northwards very slowly, a lot of fine weather, this is
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dragging in the rain into north—eastern england, southern and eastern scotland, some of this rain curls to the west of wales and cornwall where today it has been raining in some spots heavily on and off. let's look at the rush hour tomorrow. starting in the south—west, cornwall and devon in for some rain but by somerset and into central southern england, south east anglia, it's looking dry. still some puddles out there because we've had a lot of rainfall. damp in sheffield, kids getting into belfast, you can see the rain across the southern uplands and getting into central scotland but there might be sunshine coast all away. this whole weather front, it's trying to pivot back into, moving northwards, westwards, 13 in
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belfast, there might be some bright weather, this is thursday night, into friday, the remnants of this weather front. this is into friday, the remnants of this weatherfront. this is where into friday, the remnants of this weather front. this is where we have the heaviest rain and quite a strong wind blowing across central and eastern areas. a few sprinkles that i think we will see such a developing, 23 degrees in london, the north between 1a and 60 degrees, there's a light of the end of the tunnel, if you had enough of the rain, the weather is looking brighter this weekend, sunday, there might be rain on saturday but sunday is looking better, have a great weekend whatever this is bbc news. i'm ben brown in warrington. six people will be charged in connection with the hillsborough football stadium disaster, 28 years ago. former chief superintendent david duckenfield and three other officers
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face charges including manslaughter by gross negligence. following these thorough investigations and our careful review of the evidence in accordance with the code for crown prosecutors, i have decided there is sufficient evidence to charge six individuals with criminal offences. relatives of some of the 96 people who died at hillsborough say it's the right decision. i'm absolutely delighted. we've got today everything that we could have asked for.
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